Learn More About Mongolian Culture

6/2/2014 Ada Tours Inner Mongolia 1802
Speaking of the Mongolian culture, you will be familiar with the name Genghis Khan. Traditionally Genghis Khan had been revered for centuries among the Mongols and among certain other ethnic groups such as the Turks, largely because of his association with Mongol statehood, political and military organization, and his historic victories in war. He eventually evolved into a larger-than-life figure chiefly among the Mongols and is still considered the symbol of Mongolian culture.



In Mongolia today, Genghis Khan's name and likeness are endorsed on products, streets, buildings, and other places. His face can be found on everyday commodities, from liquor bottles to candy products, and on the largest denominations of 500, 1,000, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 Mongolian tögrög. Mongolia's main international airport in Ulaanbaatar is named Chinggis Khaan International Airport. Major Genghis Khan statues have been erected before the parliament and near Ulaanbaatar.

Mausoleum of Genghis Khan:

As his final house, the Mausoleum of Genghis Khan is a temple devoted to the worship of Genghis Khan. It is located along a river in Kandehuo Enclosure, Xinjie Town, Ejen Khoruu Banner, Ordos Prefecture-Level City, Inner Mongolia. The mausoleum is a cenotaph, where the coffin contains no body but only headdresses and accessories, because the actual Tomb of Genghis Khan has never been discovered.


The mausoleums were singled out as the symbol of the Mongol nation by some Mongol nationalists. The new mausoleum was constructed by the government of Inner Mongolia from 1954 to 1956, despite Ordos opposition. The government abolished the traditional portable mausoleums and moved their historic relics to the new mausoleum. It also dismissed 500 family Darkhad so that only seven or eight Darkhad served the mausoleum. During the Cultural Revolution, Red Guards destroyed the mausoleum and valuable treasures were lost. It was rebuilt later, but replicas had to be made for some lost treasures.


Genghis Khan worship is a religion popular among Mongolians, with ties to traditional Mongolian shamanism. There are other temples of this worship culture in Inner Mongolia and Northern China.



What’s more, from 2012, Mongolia celebrate Chinggis Khaan's birthday as a national holiday, on the first day of winter according to the Mongolian lunar calendar (not to be confused with the Asian new year). People walk past the white tower to pray for good luck during the memorial rites honoring Genghis Khan, the 13th-century Mongolian warrior and founder of the Mongol Empire, at the Mausoleum of Genghis Khan in Ejin Horo Banner, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, April 11, 2012. The memorial rites, dating back over seven centuries, is held from March 17 to March 24 on the Chinese Lunar calendar annually. You can also see prayers touching horses, which is believed to have special spiritual power for good luck during the memorial rites honoring Genghis Khan.



The memorial rites, dating back over seven centuries, is held from March 17 to March 24 on the Chinese Lunar calendar annually.
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